All in a Day's Walk

A month-long slow food walking performance

About

All in a Day’s Walk

|ôl in ə dā’s wôk| |ôl in ə dā’s wôk|

from all in a day’s work (of something unusual or difficult) accepted as part of someone’s normal routine or as a matter of course from all in a day’s work (of something unusual or difficult) accepted as part of someone’s normal routine or as a matter of course

All in a Day’s Walk is a month-long tracktivist walking performance in which I live entirely within the distance I am able to walk away from home in a day, sustaining myself only on the food that is grown, harvested, processed and obtainable within this distance. I travel only on foot, accepting no lifts and using no public transport. I accept no hospitality or food from hosts or visitors that does not meet these criteria.

The score has been performed twice, once in winter (6th December 2012 – 6th January 2013) and once in summer (6th July – 6th August 2013). In the winter I slowed down and lost weight, observing the score religiously. In the summer I sped up and lost faith, subverting the score flagrantly. The score has been performed twice, once in winter (6th December 2012 – 6th January 2013) and once in summer (6th July – 6th August 2013). In the winter I slowed down and lost weight, observing the score religiously. In the summer I sped up and lost faith, subverting the score flagrantly.

Either way, the intention was to draw attention to loss – particularly of local food infrastructure – and to counter the disconnection that may lie at the root of wider environmental concerns. It was also an exploration of personal horizons, endurance, edges and empathy: measuring out by foot the limits of my existence-subsistence-persistence.

Tracktivism is about talking and listening, and my walks are intended to facilitate conversational encounters: both with the people I meet randomly on my route or pre-arranged at a specific destination… walkers, farmers, growers, millers, bakers, apiarists, artisan cider-producers, foresters, road-workers, yurt-makers, butchers, bakers and candlestick-makers. We talk about the weather. We talk about talking. We talk about wood and wassailing. But mostly we talk about f o o d , where it comes from, how to grow it, how to find it, how to cook it and why it matters…

It’s slow food meets slow activism meets slow performance. So, please take some time to meander through these pages if you wish, and leave some slow comments…

Jess Allen, August 2013